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Type 1 diabetes

Diabetes: The differences between types 1 and 2

Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus (DM), is a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use sugar.It affects the body ‘s ability to use glucose, a type of sugar found in the blood, as fuel. This happens because the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells do not correctly respond to insulin to use glucose as energy.

Insulin is a type of hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate how blood sugar becomes energy. An imbalance of insulin or resistance to insulin causes diabetes.

Diabetes is linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, vision loss, neurological conditions, and damage to blood vessels and organs.

There is type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. They have different causes and risk factors, and different lines of treatment.

This article will compare the similarities and differences of types 1 and 2 diabetes.

Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and typically resolves after childbirth.

However, having gestational diabetes also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, so patients are often screened for type 2 diabetes at a later date.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States (U.S.) have diabetes.
Fast facts on diabetes

 Type 1 diabetes is often hereditary and unpreventable.
Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1. For every person with type 1 diabetes, 20 will have type 2.
Type 2 can be hereditary, but excess weight, a lack of exercise and an unhealthy diet increase
At least a third of people in the U.S. will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime.
Both types can lead to heart attack, stroke, nerve damage, kidney damage, and possible amputation of limbs.

Causes

People with type 1 diabetes will require supplemental insulin on an ongoing basis. People with type 2 will likely only need this for the later stages of the condition.
In type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells.

These cells are destroyed, reducing the body’ s ability to produce sufficient insulin and regulate blood glucose levels.

The

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